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The enzyme CYP2C9

The enzyme CYP2C9 (full name: Cytochrome P450 2C9) is involved in the metabolisation of xenobiotics, such as drugs. Around 10 to 20% of all drugs are metabolised by CYP2C9. Drugs that can be metabolised by the enzyme CYP2C9 include:

  • NSAIDs such as naproxen, diclofenac and ibuprofen
  • Antihyperglycemic drugs such as tolbutamide, glipizide, glimepiride and nateglinide
  • Antihypertensives such as losartan and irbesartan
  • Anticoagulants such as S-warfarin, acenocoumarol and phenprocoumon
  • Other drugs such as phenytoin (anticonvulsant), fluvastatin (cholesterol-lowering drug) and tamoxifen (anti-oestrogen)

Celecoxib and the enzyme CYP2C9

Celecoxib is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of celecoxib can also differ from person to person, as can the risk of side effects.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to a treatment with celecoxib.

Read more about Celecoxib »

Flurbiprofen and the enzyme CYP2C9

Flurbiprofen is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of flurbiprofen can also differ from person to person, as can the risk of side effects.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to flurbiprofen.

Read more about Flurbiprofen »

Ibuprofen and the enzyme CYP2C9

Ibuprofen is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of ibuprofen can also differ from person to person, as can the risk of side effects.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to a treatment with ibuprofen.

Read more about Ibuprofen »

Lornoxicam and the enzyme CYP2C9

Lornoxicam is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of lornoxicam can also differ from person to person, as can the risk of side effects.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to a treatment with lornoxicam.

Read more about Lornoxicam »

Meloxicam and the enzyme CYP2C9

Meloxicam is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of meloxicam can also differ from person to person, as can the risk of side effects.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to a treatment with meloxicam.

Read more about Meloxicam »

Phenytoin and the enzyme CYP2C9

Phenytoin is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of phenytoin can also differ from person to person.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to a treatment with phenytoin.

Read more about Phenytoin »

Piroxicam and the enzyme CYP2C9

Piroxicam is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of piroxicam can also differ from person to person, as can the risk of side effects.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to a treatment with piroxicam.

Read more about Piroxicam »

Tenoxicam and the enzyme CYP2C9

Tenoxicam is processed to a large extent by the enzyme CYP2C9. The activity of this enzyme can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of tenoxicam can also differ from person to person, as can the risk of side effects.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to a treatment with tenoxicam.

Read more about Tenoxicam »

Warfarin and the enzyme CYP2C9

Warfarin is processed within the body primarily by the enzymes CYP2C9 and VKORC1. The activity of these enzymes can vary considerably depending on your genetic predisposition, which means the efficacy of warfarin can also differ from person to person.

Information about your genetic predisposition may therefore provide grounds for extra vigilance in relation to the effectiveness of the treatment, for adjustment of the dose or for more frequent checks by the thrombosis clinic.

Read more about Warfarin »

Genetic predisposition
The activity of the enzyme CYP2C9 varies from one individual to another. As a result, the efficacy of a drug can differ from person to person, as can the potential side effects. This variation can be partly explained by genetic variations in the CYP2C9 gene.
When a genotype is determined these variations in the CYP2C9 gene are indicated by two so-called alleles. Each allele has a name consisting of an asterisk (*) and a number. An example of a possible CYP2C9 genotype is CYP2C9*2/*3.
At iGene we determine the following variants (alleles) of the CYP2C9 gene: CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, CYP2C9*5, CYP2C9*6, CYP2C9*8, CYP2C9*11, CYP2C9*13, CYP2C9*15 and other (classified as CYP2C9*1).